Father BANS his children from taking antibiotics and painkillers

Posted on Nov 28, 2018 in Uncategorized

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A father has defended his decision to ban his children from taking medicine – including antibiotics, painkillers and even Calpol.

Richard Lanigan and his wife Janette have never given daughters Molly and Isabelle, 14, and Eloise, 11, medication and say their immune systems are better for it.

The couple, who live in south-west London, even kept one baby away from hospital when doctors told them she was likely to die from whooping cough – and believe the natural nutrients in Janette’s breast milk kept her alive.

The girls never took part in their immunisation programme as babies and have never even had a Lemsip.

The only time the three children had vaccinations is when they were immunised before going holiday this summer.

Richard and his wife Janette have never given daughters Molly and Isabelle, 14, and Eloise, 11, (pictured is Richard with his daughters) and he claimed on the ITV daytime programme that they have 'lifetime immunity' from the diseases because of it

Richard Lanigan and his wife Janette have never given daughters Molly and Isabelle, 14, and Eloise, 11, (pictured is Richard with his daughters)

Mr Lanigan's daughter Isabelle is pictured with chicken pox as an infant, but was not given medicine or pain killers to treat it. Her father claims it has made her stronger

Mr Lanigan’s daughter Isabelle is pictured with chicken pox as an infant, but was not given medicine or pain killers to treat it. Her father claims it has made her stronger

Richard Lanigan (pictured with his wife and their three children) believes keeping calm when his children are ill can help cure them because 'anxiety gets passed on' 

Richard Lanigan (pictured with his wife and their three children) believes keeping calm when his children are ill can help cure them because ‘anxiety gets passed on’

Mr Lanigan says avoiding modern medicine is the best thing to do because it maximises his girls’ immune systems.

In fact, he is so against unnatural substances, he has never even allowed the trio to take popular children’s remedies like Calpol – a paracetamol-based medicine used by millions of parents.

While Mr Lanigan concedes that his approach to health is controversial, he and Janette are certain it has made their children more capable of recovering from illness.

The twins and their sister have barely suffered any health problems – the only thing they have had are occasional colds, but they are rarely severe.

And he says more parents should follow his lead.

The 61-year-old former chiropractor, who also has a son from a previous relationship, said: ‘The evidence clearly demonstrates that you can strengthen children’s immune systems by allowing them to play in the dirt when they are young and get infections.

‘I strengthen my girls’ immune systems by allowing them to get diseases.

‘They have less time off than other kids at their school, but that’s not because of one particular thing – it’s a way of life.’

He claims exposure to infection was what nature intended, and at 5’8′ his 14-year-old twins have grown into strong, tall, healthy teenagers because of it.

Mr Lanigan added: ‘I look at my children and they deal with illness quite well.

‘If you look at how we’ve evolved, humans became stronger by getting illnesses.

‘The process of natural selection meant the strongest survived.

‘If you rely on vaccinations and medication for optimal health, you’re creating a weaker species.

‘Eventually something like the Spanish flu will come along and wipe out millions.

‘I could live with natural selection, even though it seems pretty harsh.’

When it comes to treating pain, the Lanigans reach for natural remedies and never take painkillers.

Substances like Anadin, Lemsip and other over-the-counter medicines are simply not kept in their kitchen cupboards.

And he says more parents should consider his way of life to end up with healthier, more resilient children.

He said: ‘Ice is the most effective anti-inflammatory and pain relief for my kids. You don’t see them popping pills.

‘But there’s no money for the pharmaceutical industry in frozen water, so they encourage people to take drugs.’

The first time one of his daughters was given painkillers was after youngest daughter Eloise hit her head aged seven and was taken to A&E.

Two nurses had to pin her down to give her Calpol because she didn’t know what it was and spat it out.

When asked whether she was allergic to any antibiotics, Mr Lanigan had to admit that he didn’t know – because she’d never taken any.

He added: ‘Nurses were looking at me like a new age freak – they couldn’t believe that she had never had antibiotics by that age.’

Mr Lanigan says that with antibiotic resistance becoming an increasing issue, more people should rethink their approach to medication.

‘We should be trying to optimise the immune system,’ he added.

‘I would never tell somebody to do what I do, but what doctors are doing by giving out antibiotics willy-nilly is interrupting an evolving species that has spent millions of years getting healthier.

‘People go to the GP when their kids have the sniffles because it’s free and it’s advice – but our healthcare system has been taken over by the pharmaceutical industry.

‘Antibiotics have been used to cure every type of disease, and now we have bacteria that are resistant to them.

‘When it comes to illness it should be down to how that person’s immune system handles it.

‘If they’re the weakest in the species, tough, that may have sad outcomes but should we compromise the wellbeing of many children for the few who can’t have vaccines.’

Instead of rushing to his GP when his daughters get sick, Mr Lanigan uses his own alternatives to treat them at home in Thames Ditton, Surrey.

If they had poorly tummies as kids, he would give them flat Coca Cola to settle it.

He says Coke is not a healthy option, but the acid kills bad tummy bacteria – and a night of sleep in his and Janette’s bed usually sorted them out.

He said: ‘I try and take the common sense approach to healthcare and think about how our bodies work.

‘If my girls got hit by a bus, they’d be going to A&E – that’s what emergency medicine is good at.

‘But they’re not so good at healthcare. If they were, we wouldn’t have the rise in autoimmune disorders and chronic illnesses like Type 2 Diabetes we’re seeing.’

When Eloise was born in 2003, all three girls contracted whooping cough – but Mr Lanigan argues their response to the disease proves how strong their immune systems are.

He says he was told 75 per cent of those who contract the disease die, but even though he and his wife knew how infectious it was, they took the baby home.

And it was Janette’s breast milk that gave her a fighting chance.

He admits: ‘I’m fully aware that whooping cough can have horrible consequences in some predisposed children.

‘They could have put her in hospital but we kept her at home because the treatment they would have given her would make her vulnerable to infections like pneumonia.

‘We were told that the chances were she was going to die, but if we didn’t know that she had Whooping Cough, we wouldn’t even have thought she had a cold.

‘I suspect because she was so young and being breast-fed and healthy she responded better.’

Richard adds that keeping his older daughters calm throughout their illness helped their recovery.

‘If you don’t get anxious they actually get through it easier, because your anxiety gets passed on to the children,’ he said.

 

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