Technology

Bionic pancreas frees people from shackles of diabetes

Posted on Jul 7, 2014 in Medical Rewind, Technology

Ed Damiano’s son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2000. He was 11 months old. Damiano, a biomedical engineer, decided to create a device that would help his child and millions of others better manage their disease. He set a goal of having it ready by the time his son went to college. Results from the latest clinical trials of his smartphone-linked artificial pancreas suggest he might just make that deadline. Type 1 diabetes occurs when beta islet cells in the pancreas die off. These cells sense levels of blood sugar, aka glucose, in the blood and secrete the necessary amount of...

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Genetically engineered super-banana could save millions of lives

Posted on Jul 5, 2014 in Medical Rewind, Technology

Malnutrition is a problem across large swaths of the globe, but it’s a difficult problem to solve. It’s not only a matter of people getting enough to eat; they need to have the right combination of food as well. People in developing countries often subside on a very limited diet, which can lead to life-threatening vitamin deficiencies. Surprisingly, a genetically modified (GM) super-banana backed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation might be a key weapon in the fight against malnutrition. Yeah, it’s not as sexy as the Gates-backed condoms. So what makes it “super?” This banana is...

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Medical Rewind – May 12th

Posted on May 20, 2014 in Environment, Health & Wellness, Heavy Metals, Medical Rewind, Technology

If you missed Medical Rewind with Dr. Rashid A. Buttar and Robert Scott Bell, be sure to go to www.MedicalRewind.com to listen to the show replay. Some of the things you will hear Dr. Buttar and Robert talk about in this week’s show are: Dr. Rashid Buttar and RSB discuss the MERS phenomenon, ADHD drugs and EMF pollution. Could this new respiratory threat from the Middle East really be evidence of toxicological overload, rather than a coronavirus from camel sneezes? There are many ways to keep kids from smoking, but who would of thought that Ritalin and Adderall could be promoted on the...

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Scientists race to develop farm animals to survive climate change

Posted on May 17, 2014 in Health Optimization, Medical Rewind, Political, Technology

Chickens mill inside a coop at the University of Delaware, where researchers are working on creating new breeds of poultry that would be resilient in the face of climate change. (Kathy F. Atkinson / University of Delaware) .. .. When a team of researchers from the University of Delaware traveled to Africa two years ago to search for exemplary chickens, they weren’t looking for plump thighs or delicious eggs. They were seeking out birds that could survive a hotter planet. The researchers were in the vanguard of food scientists, backed by millions of dollars from the federal government,...

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Medical Rewind – April 21st

Posted on May 2, 2014 in Medical Rewind, Technology

If you missed Medical Rewind with Dr. Rashid A. Buttar and Robert Scott Bell, be sure to go to www.MedicalRewind.com to listen to the show replay. Some of the things you will hear Dr. Buttar and Robert talk about in this week’s show are: Dr. Rashid Buttar and RSB discuss more about the state of medicine in America and around the globe. How is it that we have lost our way in the West? How may we regain health integrity and a system that actually promotes genuine healing? How likely are you to suffer from medical errors in the licensed monopoly of allopathy? Would a surgeon really remove...

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New attention disorder could equal a big new ADHD drug market. But is it legit? Read more: New attention disorder could equal a big new ADHD drug market. But is it legit?

Posted on May 1, 2014 in Autism, Heavy Metals, Medical Rewind, Technology

There could be a new attention disorder on the block in the future–one that could open up a new patient pool for ADHD drugmakers Eli Lilly ($LLY), Shire ($SHPG) and others. But with pharma critics adept at pointing fingers at companies for “disease-mongering,” it’s one that could open up a new round of controversy, too. The potential new disorder, dubbed sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) and characterized by lethargy, daydreaming and slow mental processing, could be on its way to recognition as a legitimate condition, The New York Times reports. The condition could be a...

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